Course Catalog

ARABIC LITERATURE II (AB5070)

This course continues the exploration of Arabic literature, integrating increasingly more pieces from the classical period (the first Adab era, Adab taken here as humanities). Frequenting the classical Arabic adab allows the students to deepen their linguistic knowledge and to see more precisely how the lexicon evolved through the ages and, therefore, to better understand how terms and concepts moved from one field of application to nother (history, philosophy, poetry, religion, geography narrations, tales, akhbar, etc.). Linguistic knowledge is here deeply related to history of thought and representations through texts reveal a certain conception of the world and humanity.

INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART I (AH1000)

Teaches the skills needed for an informed approach to art and architecture by introducing the salient concepts, techniques, and developments from Prehistory and Antiquity through the end of the Middle Ages. Studies works in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Includes visits to museums and monuments in and around Paris.

INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS (AH1003)

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART II (AH1020)

Continues the study of selected monuments of painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums. The overall themes of the class may vary by semester.

LES JEUNES ONT LA PAROLE (AH1030)

Les Jeunes ont la parole is a program organized by the Louvre Museum, in cooperation with a dozen Parisian educational institutions including The American University of Paris, to attract the younger generation into its venerable walls. As part of the Louvre’s Les Nocturnes du vendredi, participating students dialogue with peers and other museum visitors around a work of art that he or she has studied in depth. A unique hands-on opportunity, the one-credit course involves preparatory meetings, preliminary research, Friday-evening presentations, and a final write-up. May be taken twice for credit.

TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (AH1091)

Topics vary by semester

FIRSTBRIDGE IN ART HISTORY (AH1099)

Firstbridge courses are offered to degree seeking freshmen and registration is done via webform in pre-arrival checklist.

TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (AH1910)

Topics vary by semester

PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I (AH2000)

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN PARIS (AH2004)

Celebrated for the beauty of its architectural past, Paris is also a rapidly changing, dynamic, modern metropolis in the present. From its historical center to newer neighbourhoods at the city's periphery, recent buildings and urban projects have altered Paris and made it the site of significant modern architecture and urbanism. This course introduces the major new monuments and urban designs that characterize the city today. Following a brief historical introduction, the Grand Projects such as the Louvre Pyramid, the Grand Arch and the Bastille Opera, as well as more modest and unassuming structures, will be studied on site. Focussing on the major architectural and urban undertakings of the past few decades, such as museums, libraries, cultural centers, housing projects and public parks, this course explores how the architecture and urban fabric of the past have been reassessed to suit modern materials, tastes and needs. Students will also investigate how international influences have been adapted, adopted, or rejected in the creation of Paris today. Emphasis is placed on the students' grasp of the material, rather than the completion of a chronological survey.